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Things to do in Grand Canyon National Park

Grand Canyon National Park United States

Terrific Canyon National Park United States is the fifteenth site in the United States to have been named a national stop. Named an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979, the recreation center is situated in northwestern Arizona. The Grand Canyon National Park United States focal element is the Grand Canyon, a crevasse of the Colorado River, which is regularly viewed as one of the Wonders of the World. The recreation center, which covers 1,217,262 sections of land of unincorporated territory in Coconino and Mohave regions, got almost six million recreational guests in 2016, which is the second most noteworthy check of all U.S. national stops after Great Smoky Mountains National Park.


Grand Canyon National Park Attractions


The view from the South Rim is fantastic for the general scenes, yet to truly encounter the Canyon you ought to set aside the opportunity to do no less than a short climb down beneath the edge and see it on an alternate scale. It is one of the colossal Grand Canyon National Park's fascination. In the event that topography has dependably appeared to be exhausting to you, the Grand Canyon is the place to demonstrate you off-base. To get a prologue to the topography and regular history of Grand Canyon, stop by the as of late reestablished gallery at Yavapai Point. It is additionally one of the considerable Grand Canyon National Park's fascination.

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Grand Canyon

Grand Canyon

One of the most well-known natural formations in the world, the Grand Canyon is a sight to behold. The canyon measures 10 miles across on average and 277 miles in length. The Colorado River - which carved the formation - flows through it. The area is part of the Grand Canyon national park. It has historically been home to many Native American tribes, such as the Puebloan people. The first European explorers arrived here in the year 1540.

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Grand Canyon Visitor Center

Grand Canyon Visitor Center

The main visitor center for Grand Canyon national park is located near Mather’s point. You may obtain maps and brochures about the park from here and there is a park ranger always at the desk for inquiries. The visitor center has numerous exhibits on history, with a number of publications. The Grand Canyon association and non-profit organization also operates there. The visitor Center has been made more accessible and its services upgraded in recent years.

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Bright Angel Trail

Bright Angel Trail

The trail is a part of Grand Canyon national park and is characterized as a ‘corridor trail’. The trail is made safe for tourists by maintenance and even patrols by park rangers. The trail is 8 miles long, and a further 1.9 miles to Phantom ranch and Bright Angel campground via River Trail. It starts at Grand Canyon Village, located on the south side of Grand Canyon. The trail was originally built by the Havasupai people.

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Desert View Drive

Desert View Drive

A route to the east of Grand Canyon village, the route goes along the rim for 25 miles (40 km). The road takes one to Desert view watchtower. There are quite a few points of interest on the way and worth a stopover for a picnic or photo. The look out or viewpoints are developed, and accessible with private vehicles, all except Yaki point that can be reached via a free shuttle bus. Also worth visiting is Tusayan Museum.

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Desert View Watchtower

Desert View Watchtower

The Desert view scenic route takes one to the watchtower, accompanied by the sight of historic buildings of the region. The watchtower itself is an impressive building built in 1932 by Mary Coltor, and does fill one with a sense of awe. It has been maintained for visitors to climb and witness views of the scenery. The watchtower has a visitor center/bookstore built into it and includes further amenities, such as a snack bar and a seasonal campground.

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Grand Canyon Railway 

Grand Canyon Railway 

This railroad goes to and from William, Arizona to Grand Canyon national park. The railroad is quite old and had its inaugural run in 1901. It was closed for commercial use in 1974 and has been under preservation. The railroad has since been listed in the National Register of historic places. The railway serves as a tourist attraction and hotel, with a locomotive of the old era carrying passengers to the Grand Canyon.

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Grand Canyon Village

Grand Canyon Village

As old as the railway, the Grand Canyon village was established in 1901 and is now a historic site. Many of its buildings still in use are of that time, and it has been designated a National Historic Landmark by the United States government. It is a definite site for visitors to take a stroll in and take photographs. The primary purpose of the village itself is to accommodate tourists visiting the Grand Canyon.

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Grand Canyon Skywalk in Peach Springs

Grand Canyon Skywalk in Peach Springs

This skywalk is a bridge with a glass walkway. The bridge is a cantilever design and extends out over the canyon. It is owned by the native American Hualapai tribe who intend to further develop the complex. The complex will include a museum, movie theater and several restaurants, according to Hualapai sources. The complex itself is part of a grand plan to develop the region into Grand Canyon west with its own route, much like the South rim.

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Rim Trail

Rim Trail

Most of this trail is paved and is well defined. There is shade along the trail, which makes day hikes easier, however it is still recommended to hike during the shadier times of the day. There is no water along the trail, so it is necessary to carry and manage supplies, rest often and stay cool. The National Park Service warns of lightening during summer thunderstorms, surfaces maybe slippery in winter. The trail provides viewpoints at Hermits road.

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South Kaibab Trail

South Kaibab Trail

The trail is maintained but has very little shade. The trail is accessible only by shuttle bus and is patrolled, at times, by park rangers. The trail offers beautiful views and, it can be easy to lose track of your time on it. The national Park Service recommends you take twice as long to hike up as you did to hike down. There are mules as well on the trail, and when encountering them, follow the instructions of the wrangler.