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Things to do in Queenstown

Best attractions to visit in Queenstown

1. Lake Wakatipu - Queenstown

Lake Wakatipu

Lake Wakatipu is an inland lake in the South Island of New Zealand. It is in the southwest corner of the Otago locale, close to its limit with Southland. Lake Wakatipu originates from the first Māori word Whakatipu wai-māori. The lake is depleted by the Kawarau River, which streams out from the lake's Frankton Arm, 8 km (5.0 mi) east of Queenstown. Until around 18,000 years prior the Mataura River depleted Lake Wakatipu. Lake Wakatipu is prestigious for its picturesque excellence, being encompassed by mountains. The Remarkables mountain run lies along its southeastern edge.

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2. Milford Sound - Queenstown

Milford Sound

Arranged on the west shore of the South Island, Milford Sound is a combination of staggering common elements with stunning visual signs around each corner. Milford Sound is a cove in the southwest of New Zealand's South Island. It's known for towering Miter Peak, in addition to rainforests and waterfalls like Stirling and Bowen falls, which dive down its sheer sides. The inlet is home to hide seal settlements, penguins and dolphins. Milford Discovery Center and Underwater Observatory offers perspectives of uncommon dark coral and other marine life. Watercraft visits are a well known approach to investigate.

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3. Coronet Peak - Queenstown

Coronet Peak

Coronet Peak is a business skifield in Queenstown, New Zealand found seven kilometers west of Arrowtown, on the southern inclines of the 1,649 meter crest which shares its name. A prevalent ski resort in the Southern Hemisphere, Coronet Peak offers a long snow season, generally welcomed skiing and snowboarding territory and lift frameworks. The Peak is one of New Zealand's most prevalent ski resorts because of its vicinity to Queenstown, differed landscape and quality offices, offering a rapid quad chairlift, fast six-seater chairlift and, as of the 2010 season, a fast apprentice chairlift.

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4. The Remarkables - Queenstown

The Remarkables

The Remarkables are a mountain go and skifield in Otago in the South Island of New Zealand. Situated on the southeastern shore of Lake Wakatipu, the range satisfies its name by rising strongly to make a noteworthy background for the waters. The mountains were named The Remarkables by Alexander Garvie in 1857-58,[2] professedly in light of the fact that they are one of just two mountain goes on the planet which run straightforwardly north to south.[citation needed] A substitute clarification for the name given by local people is that early Queenstown pioneers, after observing the mountain go amid nightfall one night, named them the Remarkables to depict the sight.

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5. Skippers Canyon - Queenstown

Skippers Canyon

Skippers Canyon is a notable and picturesque crevasse, exactly 22 kilometers long, that is found a few kilometers north of Queenstown. Today gotten to from Queenstown by means of a similar street that prompts Coronet Peak skifield, Skippers Canyon houses the Shotover River, one of New Zealand's wealthiest gold-bearing waterways which was named by William Gilbert Rees. Rees, his better half Frances and brother by marriage Nicholas von Tunzelmann were the primary European pilgrims in and close where Queenstown is presently found. Once a bustling goldmining territory, Skippers Canyon was gotten to by Skippers Road, which is today one of New Zealand's better known picturesque streets.

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6. Routeburn Track - Queenstown

Routeburn Track

The Routeburn Track is a widely acclaimed tramping 32 km track found in the South Island of New Zealand. The track is normally finished by beginning on the Queenstown side of the Southern Alps, at the northern end of Lake Wakatipu, and completing on the Te Anau side, at the Divide, a few kilometers from the Homer Tunnel to Milford Sound. The New Zealand Department of Conservation characterizes this track as a Great Walk and keeps up four cottages along the track: Routeburn Flats Hut, Routeburn Falls Hut, Lake Mackenzie Hut, and Lake Howden Hut; what's more there is a crisis protect at Harris Saddle.

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7. Lake Wanaka - Queenstown

Lake Wanaka

Lake Wanaka is situated in the Otago area of New Zealand, at a height of 300 meters. Covering a region of 192 km², it is New Zealand's fourth biggest lake, and assessed to be more than 300 m profound. Its name is Māori, a debasement of Oanaka. Lake Wanaka lies at the heart of the Otago Lakes in the lower South Island of New Zealand. The township is arranged in an ice sheet cut bowl on the shores of the lake and is the passage to Mt Aspiring National Park.

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8. Lake Hayes - Queenstown

Lake Hayes

It is located close to the towns of Arrowtown and Queenstown. The local Māori iwi (tribe) of Kai Tahu originally named the lake Te Whaka-ata a Haki-te-kura after an ancestress called Haki-te-kura whose image was said to be reflected in the lake. Lake Hayes is a small lake in the Wakatipu Basin in Central Otago, in New Zealand's South Island. The Lake Hayes Showgrounds which have a pavilion and parking area has an annual show called The Lake Hayes A&P Show.

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9. Hollyford Track - Queenstown

Hollyford Track

The Hollyford Track is a tramping track in New Zealand. Situated at the northern edge of Fiordland, in the southwestern South Island, it is abnormal among Fiordland's significant tracks in that it is to a great extent level and open year-round. The Māori individuals were the first to settle the range around Martins Bay, however when of the entry of Europeans in the mid-nineteenth century, just a modest bunch stayed in the territory. One of these was Tutoko, for whom Mount Tutoko, which rises 2700m over the Hollyford valley, was along these lines named.

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10. Ben Lomond Walkway - Queenstown

Ben Lomond Walkway

The Ben Lomond Track is a requesting climb, however on crisp mornings trampers are remunerated at the summit with tremendous all encompassing perspectives. For the main fragment, go through local beech woodland on the One Mile Creek walk, or Douglas fir stands by means of the Skyline Access Road. Encounter superb lake and mountain sees. The walk requires a respectable level of wellness as the last push towards the highest point of Ben Lomond is extremely steep. At the top, you'll be remunerated with remarkable perspectives and on sunny mornings, you can spot Mount Earnslaw/Pikirakatahi and Aspiring/Tititea.

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